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#CNC2021 "Code More" Mission 1 Submission Thread

After completing all the steps in your Mission 1 email, post your "Code More" goal in the thread below! If you feel up to it, post some of your assumptions and root causes, too. Maybe someone in the group can help you come up with solutions to try! Be sure to leave a helpful response to another person (or two!) if you can. Mission 1 is in the books!

Congrats on challenging yourself to Code More! If you have any questions about the challenge overall, head to the Code More Help Thread. For any technical questions throughout the challenge (or in general!) write a #help post and share with the community!

Discussion (115)

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sam9111 profile image
Samyuktha Ganeshkumar
  1. I want to code more because: I want to improve my skillset and hence my resume so that I can work on impactful projects , contribute as much as I can to open source and eventually land a good job in the future.
  2. I know I’ll have reached my “code more” goal when: My code gets good feedback from others since I was able to use the best practices, tips and tricks I learnt from the community and my Github profile is up to my satisfaction. I also wish that I will be able to solve leetcode answers more quickly and efficiently. My side project grows to a certain extent with my code and considerably good for submitting to a hackathon.
  3. My top three assumptions for reaching my goal are:
    • I will be able to give in time even when tests are happening.
    • I am in the right mindset to work and collaborate with my teammates.
    • I have enough resources to look at to finish my side project before the hackathon deadline.
  4. Of these assumptions, my riskiest is having enough "time".
  5. When I think about my riskiest assumption, three possible root causes are:
    • Coding assignments and tests in college
    • Sometimes I just do not feel like touching the computer at all i.e procrastinating, lack of self-discipline
    • I get overstressed with the ambitions and goals I set for myself
  6. 3 ways I might address these root causes are:
    • Finish college work during the day by not oversleeping
    • Meditation and Self-care before approaching the tasks I set for myself for that day
    • Using productivity techniques like Pomodoro to track my progress and take enough breaks
  7. Of these, the biggest cause that’s worth tackling first is waking up early!
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gaming_tora profile image
Tora Jane (she/her)

Sometimes I don't feel like touching the computer at all for similar reasons. Then I find myself thinking about the code when I am trying to sleep!

I like using the Pomodoro technique. I ended up getting a 30 minute sand hourglass timer because I want to give myself the opportunity to keep coding after time has ran out, in case I have gotten in the zone or flow. I didnt want to get distracted by the ding of an app or timer.

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jislamtrine profile image
j_islam

Wow, this is just the thing i do. I haven't touched my laptop for whole day. And i know that, i'll think of coding just before i go to sleep. Then i have no time and have to go to sleep, so i aspire to do it tomorrow and then... it all starts again.

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mmjordan11 profile image
Matt Jordan

I find getting to bed early and getting enough sleep is hugely helpful in waking up early and then I do some of my most productive coding in the early morning. If it works for you too, you are on the right track!

Be careful focusing too much on tools like Pomodoro. The timer alone is not the answer. You will find you get a lot done, but it might not be very meaningful work. Before you time yourself, make sure you have prioritized your to do list well. A helpful practice I have been doing is writing down everything on my mind, then crossing out everything that isn't essential. Then figure out the things you need to get done to have peace of mind when you go to sleep that night and tackle those items head-on from most important (typically hardest) to least important. This is where you can start using the Pomodoro technique.

Good luck!

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mksmsk profile image
Maxim
  1. I want to code more because: I want totally change my life and develop some skills that can allow me to live in any country and earn a good salary. I want to obtain a new profession, which is not only well-paid, but also fascinating and valuable.
  2. I know I’ll have reached my “code more” goal when: I will see 100 hours in my pomodoro app.
  3. My top three assumptions for reaching my goal are:
    • I will be codding early in the morning without distractions. Deep focus
    • I will use pomodoro, it is productive and my progress will be measurable
    • I will be a part of CNC2021, and it’ll motivate me
  4. Of these assumptions, my riskiest is coding at mornings
  5. When I think about my riskiest assumption, three possible root causes are:
    • I have lots on my plate. I am learning English, and soon I'll have an exam. Sometimes I don’t have enough energy after preparation for that test
    • I’m not a morning person, and if I go to bed too late it is harmful for my cognitive power and I could not learn efficiently
    • It can be hard to begin immediately after waking up
  6. 3 ways I might address these root causes are:
    • Turn off the phone after 9 p.m. and turn down the light. I have to go to bed before 10!
    • Energize my morning (cold shower, vigorous exercises, pu-erth tea) and start codding immediately
    • Coding first. Don’t do anything, until code for 2 hours
  7. Of these, the biggest cause that’s worth tackling first is to go to bed earlier.
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afinawalton profile image
Afina Walton

I think coding first thing in the morning is a great idea! Might have to steal it from you :)

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mksmsk profile image
Maxim

yeah, no problem =)

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testinnplayin profile image
testinnplayin

I find I code best in the morning. Afternoon after lunch is deadly for code. Zzzz

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abigailontech profile image
Abi

I want to code more because: I am looking to make a big career change!

I know I’ll have reached my “code more” goal when: I have comepleted the Front-end devloper course on codecademy and i'll have a portfolio of work to allow me to start looking for new jobs.

My top three assumptions for reaching my goal are:
I'll have enough time to complete the course.
I'll have enough discipline to work hard towards my goal.
I'll have lots of resources to keep learning and keep me interested in coding even when it gets hard.

Of these assumptions, my riskiest is having enough discipline.

When I think about my riskiest assumption, three possible root causes are:
Procrastination and worrying about making a big career change.
I get stressed when thinking about the risks i'm taking and then use avoidance so I don't have to think about it.
Not having a routine will make keeping up with work hard.

3 ways I might address these root causes are:
Being more mindful and using therapy techniques to tackle anxiety.
manage my time by building a routine and following this everyday, but not beating myself up if something becomes to hard.
Try to code for atleast 2 hours a day

Of these, the biggest cause that’s worth tackling first is building a routine so I can carve out time in my day to code!

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anitabe404 profile image
Anita Beauchamp

Hey everyone! Here's my Mission 1.

  1. I want to code more because I want to get a remote, part-time job as a programmer. I am also open to freelancing. In order to accomplish this, I need to increase my knowledge and skills (i.e. code more).
  2. I know I'll have reached my "code more" goal when I have a consistent coding practice, meaning I am not going weeks at a time without coding. Additionally, I will be in Week 3 of the second course in the Python for Everybody specialization.
  3. My top three assumptions for reaching my goal are:
    • I have enough time to code.
    • I have the emotional bandwidth and fortitude to stick with coding more.
    • I will be able to self-teach with the resources that I've found.
  4. Of these assumptions, my riskiest is emotional bandwidth.
  5. When I think about my riskiest assumption, some possible root causes are:
    • I'm a perfectionist, and I take it really hard when I don't understand things.
    • I have a lot on my plate right now. Sometimes I'm just physically and emotionally exhausted.
  6. Some ways I might address these root causes are:
    • Make sure that I'm getting enough sleep and food.
    • Keep up with my mental wellbeing through journaling & meditation.
    • Reach out and ask for help when I need it.
    • Continue to remind myself that progress is better than perfection.
  7. Of these, the biggest cause that’s worth tackling first is perfectionism.
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juanfrank77 profile image
Juan F Gonzalez

Is wonderful that you're aware of these things about yourself.

Perfectionism is certainly something I've struggled with for years.

One thing that has really helped break down that "all or nothing" mentality is to approach things like "experiments".
Think of yourself as a scientist, a "coding scientist", and test different options out there. You'll find things that work better or others that just don't work but everything is part of the experimentation process.

In that sense, there's really no "failure" only feedback to know when you're doing things right and when to course correct.

Also, you're now part of this community so...
You got this

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anitabe404 profile image
Anita Beauchamp

Thank you! I like this change in perspective. ::writes it down in notebook:: 😆

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lucidinsomniac profile image
Donna Chin

Way to go! This is like a self-learning journey on top of skill learning! Let's not forget to always be kind to yourself through this process. This seems to be a recurring theme with a lot of developers whether they are new or a veteran in the field. We all tend to burn out and leave self-care as an afterthought. Treat yourself with small rewards after each smaller accomplishment :)

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anitabe404 profile image
Anita Beauchamp

Yes, it's so easy to be hyper-critical and burn out. I continually have to remind myself that it's okay to be kind and self-compassionate. Thank you for reading & responding.

Thread Thread
gracie profile image
Gracie Gregory (she/her)

❤️

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valciic profile image
Valters
  1. I want to code more because: I want to reach the level where I can earn money with coding.
  2. I know I’ll have reached my “code more” goal when: I’ll have at least one paying client; I’ll work in a team, which works in Web-development and I will be able to contribute with code for functionality and also design of the product.
  3. My top three assumptions for reaching my goal are:
    o I need to spend at lest 1 hour a day on working on a personal project a.k.a. practice coding
    o I need to learn Wordpress in order to improve my mothers’ website (starting with design; maybe add some functionality), to have first product on my portfolio
    o I need to learn React

  4. Of these assumptions, my riskiest is spending time every day for working on a personal project.

  5. When I think about my riskiest assumption, three possible root causes are:
    o I don’t know, what exactly I would like to make
    o I feel scared to publish something I created without understanding how can I un-publish it, for example, if something goes wrong, I don’t want anybody to see what I’ve done, etc.
    o I afraid, that I will “waste time” practicing something that isn’t that valuable for the “real life’’ jobs/situations

  6. 3 ways I might address these root causes are:
    o Remember – there is no pressure to publish anything. For now, I am doing a job with added value for Visas Iespējas, so no need to put pressure on actually putting something out there just yet.
    o First, practice WordPress by making a simple blog/website for HipstersGlasses – add section about Balkan Trip, section with photos and introduction/landing page. This is to practice and get familiar with Wordpress. I don’t need to publish it just yet.
    o While practicing, I will come up with questions and I can ask them in morning “podcasts” with my team members. Also – by practicing and searching information I will find information related to what’s actual and what’s not.

  7. Of these, the biggest cause that’s worth tackling first is I just opening the Wordpress and starting to play around.

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marshmadness94 profile image
Marshall Pritchett

My main goal for the "Code More" challenge is to finish the C++ software portion of my current project. Hopefully I will have the time and resources necessary to complete this goal in the coming weeks. I will definitely need to learn more about building GUIs for C++ programs. Happy coding everyone!

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tripdog profile image
Tom

I want to code more because: Because I am stubborn. Two years ago I tried to learn JavaScript and decided, “this is just too hard." It’s always bothered me that I quit, and relying on cut/pasting from Google or hacking other people's code together is a total drag... And also because I am in a JavaScript Bootcamp and I should be writing and reading code on the daily without fail. I have committed to sharing my code via Twitter, having joined the #100daysofcode challenge. Lot’s of reasons. :-)

I know I’ll have reached my “code more” goal when: When JavaScript is as familiar as HTML and CSS.

My top three assumptions for reaching my goal are:
Due to the pandemic, I definitely have time. When life gets busy, I’ll make time.
At this stage of the game, it doesn’t take a lot of time to sit down and research some facet of JavaScript that I don’t know, because that's just about everything.
Will I be disciplined enough? I think so, because failing at this because I lack the brain for it is more acceptable to me than failing because of not trying as hard as I humanly can.

Of these assumptions, my riskiest is: That I will be disciplined enough. History shows that this has been an issue in the past.

When I think about my riskiest assumption, three possible root causes are:
a. Lack of confidence
b. A propensity for frustration when things become difficult
c. Falling behind has been a good reason in the past to throw in the towel

3 ways I might address these root causes are:

  1. Be as stubborn as I know I can be and keep going
  2. Don’t just write code, build things.
  3. Get used to code that fails or breaks. And celebrate the little victories along the way because a lot of little victories turn into big ones later.

*Of these, the biggest cause that’s worth tackling first is building things vs. just writing sample code. I know from past experience that is how I learn best. *

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lucidinsomniac profile image
Donna Chin

Is there something that grabs your attention usually, like "gaming", "puzzles", etc? Sometimes it is easier to learn through the Super Mario Effect where you learn by tricking your brain into learning a new thing with something you already enjoy.

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tripdog profile image
Tom

I feel like everything is so different this time around. Last time, I was just doing FreeCodeCamp with no support. I felt like a failure because it got to a point where I could not solve the challenges. Now I have found a few communities, like Flavio Copes Bootcamp, this platform and others where people are so willing to help. The other difference is that I realize I have to build stuff in addition to studying and doing code challenges. I am seeing a lot of growth just by changing these things around. Lastly, seeing code that throws an error or won’t execute used to really frustrate me. Now, these failures are my teachers. Just a different midset.

I do like gamified stuff. I wish there was something like flexbox zombies for JavaScript 😀

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andrewbaisden profile image
Andrew Baisden

Good luck with all of that.

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tripdog profile image
Tom

Thanks Andrew. I am going for the full immersion experience. I know it's going to be intense but that's how I learn best :-)

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zeeatwork profile image
Zenzi
  1. I want to code more because: I want to regain my feelings of exicitement and accomplishement that I used to have when I coded. I don't want my poor experience in bootcamp to end my journey and permanently effect my confidence. I miss the way I used to 'zone out' and lose time when I was fully envolved in my learning. I want to feel like I have solid JS skills so that I can branch out and experiment with other topics that interest me (Python, Data Vizualization, GIS, Data and automation, security, etc).

  2. I'll know I've reached my code more goal when: I complete one ticket per week in my open source project, finish my 4 short courses in Advanced JS concepts/interview prep, complete an interview (no matter the outcome).

  3. My top 3 assumptions for reaching my goal: I have the time, financial resources, and physical/mental health necessary to code more each day.

  4. My riskiest assumption is physical/mental health related.

  5. The prolonged pandemic, and environmental stress has caused a lot of anxiety. I don't sleep well or do as many healthy things as I used to before the pandemic. Everything feels like another chore instead of self-care.

  6. Ways to address the root cause:

    • call it what it is: burnout. Maybe the appropriate label will help me find the correct resources to help
  7. find people who have recovered

  8. Find burnout resources

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jislamtrine profile image
j_islam

I want to code more because:
I want to create a system for coding and learning things and eventually get to a point where I can get a job or do some freelancing work. I want to overcome my fear of getting into work too.

I know I’ll have reached my “code more” goal when:
I have established a routine and successfully maintained that for some time. That may be 100 lines of code for a duration or two mid-scale projects. And as the lower boundary, i’ll accept even less if I can work for at least a few days consecutively(two weeks) on the project I am getting trouble to start on.

My top three assumptions for reaching my goal are:

  • I have to overcome the fear of starting working on a project.
  • I can have enough interest if I can make myself stop worrying about starting the task.
  • I have to learn how to work on something even if there’s no passion involved.

Of these assumptions, my riskiest is my fear of getting started.

When I think about my riskiest assumption, three possible root causes are:

  • I keep thinking about the task hence creating pressure on me.
  • I procrastinate and move onto other things instead of just getting into work.
  • I haven’t done any mid/large-scale project yet so i don’t know how to approach one.

3 ways I might address these root causes are:

  • I have to trick myself to start work by saying that I'll work for one pomodoro(25 minutes) or so and then keep doing that for at least two sessions. I also won’t take a break for more than a week if it’s incomplete.
  • I should remove the sources of distraction from the surroundings.
  • I should approach the mid-scale project by dividing into MVPs with narrow scope.

Of these, the biggest cause that’s worth tackling first is my dreadful procrastination.

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mmjordan11 profile image
Matt Jordan

MVP's! I need to focus on that too. I was reading The Lean Startup by Eric Reiss and need to keep remembering to relate those learnings to my work. MVPs even work when ultimately I am the customer.

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afinawalton profile image
Afina Walton • Edited on

I want to code more because: I'd like to build a robust front-end skillset that includes all the learning areas I've whittled down from entry-level FE job listings.

One of my assumptions is: that I might not know how to apply what I've learned.

A root cause for that is: not knowing exactly what type of front-end work I'd like to do, so I don't know which projects to come up with to build out a portfolio.

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pasha profile image
Me-Pasha • Edited on

I want to code more because:
The ability to code seems to provide a good opportunity. It is also a thrill to be able to create something out of thin air! And I feel as I grow more and learn more about different fields, I can use the knowledge of the field and combine it with programming to make work easier. .

I know I’ll have reached my “code more” goal when: I'll say I have reached my goal when I have completed my Android development course. .

My top three assumptions for reaching my goal are:
I need enough time to work on it. Mostly, college work comes up and i have to prioritise things.
Due to the lack in flow or just procrastinating sometimes, i loose the interest and things become a little slow.
The quality of the reason can be a hame changer.

Of these assumptions, my riskiest is Interest.

When I think about my riskiest assumption, three possible root causes are:
Bad resource.
Other priorities kick in.
The inability to stick to it when things get twisty. I definitely need to work with it.

3 ways I might address these root causes are:
Get a buddy to work with? I have always been alone in the journey and it's less fun. Write a journal and keep a record of the progress.
Talk to people more from the field.
Instead of relying on burst of interest, I should develop a habit of sitting down and to code.

Of these, the biggest cause that’s worth tackling first is building a habit.

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mmjordan11 profile image
Matt Jordan
  1. I want to code more because:

    • I want to build useful web apps that make peoples lives better.
    • I would love to be cracking coding puzzles daily for work
    • I am interested in a career path with the opportunity of a WFH position.
  2. I know I’ll have reached my “code more” goal when:

    • I can build a full stack web app (probably MERN stack) I am proud of AND
    • publish it to my personal portfolio website.
  3. My top three assumptions for reaching my goal are:

    • Balancing my many hobbies, work, house remodel projects, and family life
    • Not overwhelming myself with information and causing a mental block
    • Giving myself the grace to skip a day when something else is more important than coding, and then being disciplined about effectively using the days that I actually have time.
  4. Of these assumptions, my riskiest is balancing the many aspects of my life to make time for coding.

  5. When I think about my riskiest assumption, three possible root causes are:

    • Over researching things that don’t matter
    • Not getting enough sleep to be efficient in my daily routine
    • Trying to do too much of the remodel project on my own.
  6. 3 ways I might address these root causes are:

    • Only research important tools. The minimum of what I need to get the job done. If I find a tool that works just use it. Don’t research every tool possible and then pick the “best one”.
    • Set a hard bedtime and stick to it. Give myself grace to leave things undone. Prepare for the next day first thing when I get home from work.
    • Get help. Schedule time to work on a remodel project and then do it when I have help. Don’t be a hero.
  7. Of these, the biggest cause that’s worth tackling first is getting enough sleep. Get into a habit of a 9:30PM-5:00AM sleep routine and don’t break it.

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minnake profile image
Minna Keinonen
  1. I want to code more because: I’m looking for job and I want to learn new skills/technology to get job in IT

  2. I know I’ll have reached my “code more” goal when: I can show my new skills in my website and I know I can do, what I want to do.

  3. My top three assumptions for reaching my goal are:
    ○ I have a clear goal in my mind (getting a job)
    ○ I know I can get help if I get stuck
    ○ I have passion and will to get through the hard stuff

  4. Of these assumptions, my riskiest is getting through the hard parts

  5. When I think about my riskiest assumption, three possible root causes are:
    ○ I try too hard to do myself than ask for help
    ○ Impostors syndrome
    ○ I don’t trust that I can do this

  6. 3 ways I might address these root causes are:
    ○ Meditate, be kind to me
    ○ Seek and ask for help if you get stuck
    ○ Have a day off

  7. Of these, the biggest cause that’s worth tackling first is being kind to myself and meditate

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lucitemple profile image
Luci Temple

My 'code more' goal for the five weeks challenge is to complete the React course I'm currently doing, complete the React Pro content on Codecademy, and complete my tasks for 2 sprints of the volunteer project I am working on.

Anyone else's biggest risk related to parenting responsibilities - high risk of changing circumstances outside of my control that I nonetheless have to prioritise if happens.

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mmjordan11 profile image
Matt Jordan

Parenting is in my near future. I'm curious what tips you have to deal with this added layer of responsibilities and continuing your self learning. I would guess part of being successful in parenting/coding is sacrificing some of your hobbies to make room for coding?

Part of my assumptions and solutions is Giving myself the grace to skip a day when something else is more important than coding, and then being disciplined about effectively using the days that I actually have time. Maybe this would help in your situation too?

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anitabe404 profile image
Anita Beauchamp

Some tips for parenting & coding:

  • Accept that things will change. Sometimes we try to tell ourselves that it won't be that different or that big of a change, but it really is (especially if you're having a newborn as opposed to adopting/caring for an older child).
  • Get as much support from family, friends, and paid help as you can. There are only so many hours in the day, and you are often exhausted for many of them. Having someone to help with childcare, cooking meals, running errands, and/or cleaning makes a huge difference.
  • Adjust your expectations to match the season of life that you're in. There may be some days where you're too tired to get everything done. You may also experience brain fog or notice that you're not retaining things like you used to. It's okay. Just scale back, keep studying, and keep going.
  • Identify what matters to you & seek balance. In the long-term (10, 20, 30 years from now), what do you want to look back and remember about this time? And also, what helps you decompress and feel happy & well? As much as you can, balance your long-term goals with your short-term needs. Maybe you have to spend less time on a hobby or coding for right now. Maybe you're not as involved with your child now so that you can code, get your new job, and have more time later. Only you can determine what's right.

All the best! I hope some of this helps.

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lahirucw profile image
LahiruCW

Yeah, I agree with your solution. Sometimes, some tasks become more prioritize in our day to day life and we have to spend, May be more time, for those tasks because they are important to our life. I remember a saying in Transformers Last knight movie "Without a sacrifice, No victory." So, sacrificing some unimportant tasks and make some time for coding is a good practice.

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jcastle13 profile image
Jason

I want to code more because:

I want to expand my software development skills.

I know I’ll have reached my “code more” goal when:

I have a good grasp on a specific skill and am able to apply it to a small project.

My top three assumptions for reaching my goal are:

  • The skill will be attainable within a certain timeline
  • The goal would be applicable to my job
  • I will be able to complete the goal with all of my other responsibilities

Of these assumptions, my riskiest is:

having enough time with my other responsibilities of work & life.

When I think about my riskiest assumption, three possible root causes are:

  • Time management
  • Priorities management
  • Life management

3 ways I might address these root causes are:

  • Setting up a schedule
  • Within the schedule setting time for each areas to focus
  • Taking time off for personal reflection

Of these, the biggest cause that’s worth tackling first is:

time management.

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sjukovic profile image
sjukovic • Edited on

Hi everyone!

I want to code more because: I want to build up my expertise in the field of development/programming. To be able to build something new and to be creative and be more employable, and of course in the same time hopefully make money.

I know I’ll have reached my “code more” goal when: I will code more fluently and with purpose and I will be more confident in what i do and to know that i did it well. I will finish a few simpler React tutorials, build some simple app for managing buildings and post it online. Then I will finish freeCodeCamp on full stack development with React to further develop my skills. After that, I will try to contribute to some interesting open source project. Then I will build a few more complex apps.

Then, (if I will still be unsure of myself :) ) I will follow plan from this site and further expand my understaning of computer science and programming in general.

Then I will apply for programming jobs AND further build on that and start to work with my colleague on his startup.

My top three assumptions for reaching my goal are:

  • I will have enough time
  • I will perservere in achieveing my goals and won’t give up when things get hard
  • I will be interested and straightforward

Of these assumptions, my riskiest is perservering when things get hard, lose focus and start to learn and work to wide… feeling stuck and not good enough.

When I think about my riskiest assumption, three possible root causes are:

  • lack of self confidence, i tend to compare to others, and if that other people solve problems before me, or better than me, than I feel like a lost case and slowly lose interest in the topic
  • not having a buddy to speak about problems who will try to declutter my thoughts and help me move on and believe in myself
  • having other more satisfying activities, like drawing, writiing stories and poetry, going to facebook and youtube and etc.

3 ways I might address these root causes are:

  • ask for help on the forums and at code newbie__
  • take small steps, not starting big, try to build an app step, it is better to walk slowly and disciplined than to try to run when you do not know how to walk yet_
  • find someone experienced to help me when i get stuck, to guide me wisely, not telling me everything, but to let me figure out the most of the parts by myself and in the same time help me not to go astray too much_

Of these, the biggest cause that’s worth tackling first is _not having a buddy who knows how to program and to speak about problems who will try to declutter my thoughts and help me move on and believe in myself. Therefore, I will try to find someone on CodeNewbie, and I will also ask my ex-work-colleague who introduced me to React for further help when I will feel confident that I am not too-unexperienced for him.

Bye,

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jatin profile image
JatinBhargava

A. I want to code more because I want to be skilled in something which helps me to get a solid foundation in my future. and want to build some projects on my own and within a team also. and able to take part in the hackathon.

B. I know I’ll have reached my “code more” goal when:

  1. When I completed one or two self-build projects and feel confident in myself.
  2. When I can able to contribute to open-source projects.

C. My top three assumptions for reaching my goal are:

  1. I know what I am doing.
  2. Always have resources on hand.

D. Of these assumptions, my riskiest is not having a proper roadmap kinda a thing. That's why I always messed up and confused about what to do next.

E. When I think about my riskiest assumption, three possible root causes are:

  1. Not having a proper guide.
  2. No feedback
  3. Lack of peer-group

F.3 ways I might address these root causes are:

  1. Code More
  2. Keep searching for the right answers.
  3. Join a group with the same objective.

G. Of these, the biggest cause that’s worth tackling first asks for advice.

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ashorta profile image
Ashorta
  1. I want to code more because:
    I will be able to improve my skill and build consistency which in turn will translate to self-growth

  2. I know I’ll have reached my “code more” goal when:
    I am able to increase the hours in coding per week
    Consistently code for specific hours every day

3.My top three assumptions for reaching my goal are:
Dedicate specific hours everyday to code
Stick to one thing at a time
Seek feedback
Of these assumptions, my riskiest is to Dedicate specific hours every day to code

  1. When I think about my riskiest assumption, three possible root causes are:
    Discipline to follow through
    Inconsistency in the days coded
    Goal to be achieved in the dedicated hours

  2. Three ways I might address these root causes are:
    Have a plan for the set Goal to be achieved
    Build discipline in being consistent
    Manage time well

  3. Of these, the biggest cause that’s worth tackling first is Build discipline in being consistent

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charst46 profile image
Charles Stoy

1) I want to become not just a coder, I want to be a competent and skilled coder.

2)When I feel confident about my coding without second guessing what I am doing; when I can sit down and code a block for a project without automatically reaching for textbooks or aids.

3) a-Time to practice; b-Finding a project that engages me, keeps me involved, c-Not stopping because I have reached a problem, not getting frustrated and quitting.

4) Stopping is my biggest risk

5) a-Fear of being incompetent, unable to deliver, b-seeing a frustration as a problem and not an opportunity to learn, c-My age will not let me be seen as a skilled and competent coder that adds value

6) a-Find an accountability buddy, b-Delivering solid code, c-Meditation and yoga

7) Fear of being incompetent

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Sanjana Konte

I want to code more because: I want to improve my coding skills. It boosts my confidence as a tech student. Also, it helps me build, work on projects, contribute more in open source, and helps in getting internships and jobs.

I know I’ll have reached my “code more” goal when: I’m confident to code at any time, anywhere, anything, and When I can write and debug code.

My top three assumptions for reaching my goal are:
I have enough time, I will not be stuck anywhere, I can code using best practices

Of these assumptions, my riskiest is: I will not be stuck anywhere

When I think about my riskiest assumption, three possible root causes are:
Lack of study buddies, like tech friends - where We can talk, discuss code and projects. This would lift me up, Lack of self-confidence, Imposter syndrome

3 ways I might address these root causes are:
Should involve more in the community, Should not hesitate to ask for advice/help when needed, code more, and should believe in myself.

Of these, the biggest cause that’s worth tackling first is to be confident and believe that I can do this.

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aaron profile image
Aaron McCollum

I want to code more because: I want to transition into a career I'm interested in, that I can take on the road for my family, and where I can actually build things.

I've gone through a few spells of burnout - somewhat due to life situations happening and taking a lot of attention away from self-teaching.

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Tora Jane (she/her)
  1. I want to code more because: I want to be more productive at work. I also want to be able to work on side projects.

  2. I know I’ll have reached my “code more” goal when: I will have completed 5 - 10 hours of coding outside of work projects. Workwise, I will have complete the project due by the end of April and added additional functionality to my other work project.

  3. My top three assumptions for reaching my goal are:

    • I will get the clarification on the requirements I need for the work project
    • I will not get stuck in analysis paralysis.
    • I will find something I am interested in working on outside of work
  4. Of these assumptions, my riskiest is analysis paralysis. I am always questioning the design pattern I am using and not sure if I am applying it correctly.

  5. When I think about my riskiest assumption, three possible root causes are:

    • My lack of experience
    • Lack of feedback
    • So many options
  6. 3 ways I might address these root causes are:

    • Code more and see what works
    • Reach out for feedback (coworkers for work project and CodeNewbie community for personal)
    • Stick the option I pick
  7. Of these, the biggest cause that’s worth tackling first is just picking an option.

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Raymond Oluoch

I want to code more because:
I want to improve my skills, be able to apply them in solving problems, and get a job.

I know I’ll have reached my “code more” goal when:
I can build a market-ready product and get constructive feedback from other engineers and users.

My top three assumptions for reaching my goal are:
Have a plan on how to achieve the goals i.e break the plans into smaller tasks
Implement the tasks in my goals and deliver
Reach out to the community for help.

Of these assumptions, my riskiest is sometimes not following the plan I put in place.

When I think about my riskiest assumption, three possible root causes are:

I want to learn a lot in a short time.
I do not prioritize tasks.
Sometimes I procrastinate a lot.
3 ways I might address these root causes are:

Be and stay motivated.
Avoid being destructed from social media apps like Facebook
Take breaks when working on a task to break the boredom.
Of these, the biggest cause that’s worth tackling first is procrastination.

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andrewbaisden profile image
Andrew Baisden

Good luck with all that!

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roluochke profile image
Raymond Oluoch

Thank you, I am gonna need all the luck I can get.

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kajsaeklof profile image
Kajsa

I want to code more because:
I want to get really really good at Vue and JavaScript. I would like to be able to contribute to open source projects.

I know I’ll have reached my “code more” goal when:
I have completed 1 or more side projects outside work, I have re-built my portfolio sight using Vue instead of React. I am dedicating a few hours a week to my own coding projects outside of work.

My top three assumptions for reaching my goal are:

  • I have enough time outside work and other life events to code.
  • I have the energy and motivation to keep coding after work or at the weekend.
  • I don't let my impostor syndrome stop me from actually publishing the projects...

Of these assumptions, my riskiest is:
Energy and motivation to keep coding outside work or at the weekend.

When I think about my riskiest assumption, three possible root causes are:

  • I have a full time job as a Junior Front-End Developer and after 8 hours of coding I'm usually to tired to switch to coding on a side project in the evening.
  • At the weekend I try and spend as much time outside. I don't want to feel as if I'm working at the weekend.
  • I work from home so my desk set up is very much associated with work. Whenever I sit down there it feels as if I'm at work.

3 ways I might address these root causes are:

  • Write down a road map for the side projects with small manageable chunks of task so that it does't feel like an overwhelming amount of work to get it finished. If I can cross off only a few small tasks each week that will give me a sense of accomplishment and motivate me to keep going.
  • Dedicate a few hours each week, and make them the same time each week, to work on side projects to get into a rhythm. Having a dedicated time for coding will create accountability.
  • Keep my workplace clean and tidy to make it inviting even outside work.

Of these, the biggest cause that’s worth tackling first is:
Write down a road map for the side projects with small manageable chunks of task so that it does't feel like an overwhelming amount of work to get it finished. If I can cross of only a few small tasks each week that will give me a sense of accomplishment and motivate me to keep going.

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Neha Maity

Hi Kajsa! I related to some of the obstacles you have. I also currently do coding for my regular job and have very little desire to code outside work. Keeping a road map is a great tip, I might have to try that for myself!

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senam86 profile image
senam86
  1. I want to code more because : I want to practice what I’ve learned during the bootcamp and develop new skills, so that I can land an exciting and well paid first role.



  2. I know I’ll have reached my “code more” goal when : I’ll have more complete projects to show and I’ll feel comfortable making my GitHub profile public.



  3. My top three assumptions for reaching my goal are :

    Get organised and stick to my set schedule
    Not to procrastinate, stay motivated and reach my daily targets
    Complete my projects



  4. Of these assumptions, my riskiest is not to procrastinate; keep being motivated



  5. When I think about my riskiest assumption, three possible root causes are: 

    I’m new to this
    Lack of confidence
    Imposter syndrome

  6. 3 ways I might address these root causes are:

    Educate myself through online courses and know when to stop and actually start coding
    Complete challenges on codewars or other websites as such
    Don’t hesitate to ask for help and get feedback on my code



  7. Of these, the biggest cause that’s worth tackling first is actually start coding my project

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hazemsoliman96 profile image
HazemSoliman96 • Edited on

1.I want to code more because: I enjoy it, to have a job in programming and to improve my skills.

  1. I know I'll have reached my goal when I'm able to code more consistently every week, contribute to opensource projects and get things done.

3.My assumptions are: I will have enough time, resources, self-discipline and motivation to focus on coding more.

4.Of these assumptions, my riskiest is: Focusing.

5.When I think about my riskiest assumption, the possible root cause is:
I get bored very very easy and fast and likes to try and learn different things that's why by time it was harder for me to focus one one thing even if i enjoy it since i'll get distracted by many different things at the same time.

6.3 ways I might address these root causes are:

  • try to focus on one thing.
  • try to stick to schedule.
  • try to turn it into a daily habit.

7.Of these, the biggest cause that’s worth tackling first is: try to stick to schedule.

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bronight profile image
Louis Williams
  1. I want to code more because:

    I want to acquire the skills necessary to make a career change to software development/engineering while completing the project I am currently working on.

  2. I know I’ll have reached my “code more” goal when:

    I will have reached my “code more” (I’m assuming this is the 5-week goal) goal when I have completed my project for the non-profit and my portfolio page.

  3. My top three assumptions for reaching my goal are:
    I think I have enough time to work on my projects, but I need to do a better job of managing and allotting that time.
    I know I have the interest and motivation, though they sometimes wane when I get discouraged by how much more I have to learn, and how little it feels like I have accomplished so far.
    I need to nail down what resources I am going to use to get comfortable and confident with the MERN stack, and what resources I will use as a reference as I work on my project.

  4. Of these assumptions, my riskiest is time management and organization of resources.

  5. When I think about my riskiest assumption, three possible root causes are:
    Maybe I incorrectly calculated how much time I actually have to code.

    Maybe I’m not sticking to the schedule I designed.

  6. 3 ways I might address these root causes are:
    Take another look at my schedule.
    Modify the non-coding parts of my schedule to more align with my coding goals.
    I may look into having an accountability buddy, preferably one who is also working on a project and learning at the same time.

  7. Of these, the biggest cause that’s worth tackling first is time management.

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dretoba91 profile image
Dare Oloruntoba

I want to code more because:

I want to get better at coding and solving real life problems and also to get a good job. ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________.

I know I’ll have reached my “code more” goal when:

I’ve finished with the courses I’m presently taking and also when I’ve been able to build numbers of projects by myself.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________.

My top three assumptions for reaching my goal are:
Time management. ________________________________________________________________

Limited resources . ________________________________________________________________
Discipline to stick with coding


Of these assumptions, my riskiest is:

The assumption of having enough time.


When I think about my riskiest assumption, three possible root causes are:

Finding ways to sort out my Bills takes most of my time. ________________________________________________________________

Most times I do think I don't know enough.


Accessing the 2 major resources is a big problem where I live.


3 ways I might address these root causes are:
Sorting my bills out much earlier. This will give me more time to concentrate on coding more.


Overcoming imposter syndrome. ________________________________________________________________

Easy access to the major resources affecting my time to code. ________________________________________________________________

Of these, the biggest cause that’s worth tackling first is:

the difficulty in accessing the 2 major resources to code more __________________________.

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testinnplayin

I want to learn the Rust programming language. I hope this will improve my memory management skills in code and learn some best practices out-of-the-box.

I know I will have reached my goal if I feel confident working on a non-trivial project in Rust.

I am assuming I have chosen a project with a small-enough scope for this challenge, that I will have the time to do it (full-time work and part-time student) and that I will actually manage to finally understand Rust.

Most at risk is the time constraint issue.

The reasons are: bad work/life balance, being too scattered with my concentration (going down rabbit holes I shouldn't be going down) and life bumps that come along and swallow up all your time rather suddenly.

Ways to solve these: leave work at the time I want to and not the time my colleagues think I should leave (i.e. no meetings that go on into the night), make time to really concentrate on what I love doing (coding and studying) and finally sometimes delegating certain life bumps to other people (like lawyers... yeah sometimes they can help you even if you have to pay them a lot).

The biggest one to tackle first is to leave work when I feel it's reasonable to. I failed learning Rust before because of the time constraint :(

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lucidinsomniac profile image
Donna Chin

I want to code more because I want to learn more from different people, and also transition careers.

I know I'll reach my "code more" goal when an employer is willing to take a chance on me and offer me a position with a team that cares about mentorship, my network of developers has grown, and I can talk someone through my code confidently without hesitation of hoping I know what I said.

My top three assumptions for reaching my goal are:

  • knowing when I have the most time alone and be able to work in silence
  • breaking things up into tasks and mapping them out
  • doing standups with my friends from full-stack boot camp

Of these assumptions, my riskiest is not respecting the time I dedicated to coding vs everything else in my life.

When I think about my riskiest assumption, three possible root causes are:

  • Fear from imposter syndrome, and that I will never be good enough to get hired
  • Insomnia and then crashing
  • Having developers block and wasting too much time figuring it out

3 ways I might address these root causes are:

  • Respecting my workout time during the day
  • Avoid coffee after 5pm
  • Draw or do a creative coding session

Of these, the biggest cause that's worth tackling first is knowing when I can have time to myself and focus.

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mccurcio profile image
Matt C

Hi D,
You said one of your goals is:

doing standups with my friends from full-stack boot camp

What are standups?

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lucidinsomniac profile image
Donna Chin

Hi Matt,
Thanks for the great question! Standups are basically check-ins with people to keep yourself accountable for what you are working on, for example, when I check in with my former classmates/friends, we usually indicate the following:

DONE: Wireframe (sketches of layout)
DOING: Working on frontend routes for react-router
BLOCKERS: Unsure of how to set up component hierarchy

I hope this clarified it a bit better, if not, please let me know :)

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mccurcio profile image
Matt C

Thanks for the explanation ;)

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lucidinsomniac profile image
Donna Chin

Anytime!